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07/27/2015

Understanding the Shock and Arc Flash Stats

The numbers show big improvements! Preventing electrical injuries in the workplace will always be a major focus in industrial safety training. Dr. Richard B. Campbell of NFPA and David A. Dini assembled the research paper on electrical accidents Occupational Injuries from Electrical Shock and Arc Flash Events. The report presents some interesting findings in regards to electrical safety trends within the United States.

It may come as no surprise that, “many workers who experience electrical injury have insufficient training for working on or around energized electrical equipment.” The report goes on to say, “production pressures, as well as inconsistency in training and communication, were identified by workers as factors that played a role in the arc flash incidents.”[1] By keeping employees up-to-speed, it not only keeps people safe, it also results in cost savings from reduced downtime and increased profits from higher productivity

There has been a positive trend over recent years; electrocutions have decreased by over 50% since 1992. We no longer have to confess that, “On average, one worker a day is electrocuted on the job.” However, like all statistics there are issues. An HVAC tech on a rooftop injured or worse by electricity is probably not considered an electrical worker by the SIC codes. The accident appears in the statistics but such data can be slightly skewed so let’s not get hung up on trying to interpret the statistical data and instead look at the overall results.

Fatal Electrical Injuries 92-13Figure 1: Fatal Work-Related Electrical Injuries in the United States, 1992-2013

The report Occupational Injuries from Electrical Shock and Arc Flash Events goes on to advocate for electrical safety training suggesting, “Available evidence indicates that better compliance with existing NFPA 70E requirements would reduce a substantial share of electrical injuries in U.S. workplaces.”[1] It’s been documented that there has been an overall drop in work-related electrical injuries in the U.S. in recent years. Having available information such as this allows leadership to make better-informed decisions for on-going improvements to workplace best practices and safety policies. Further, company leaders are starting to use this information to make better-informed decisions for on-going improvements to workplace best practices and safety policies.

Energy-saving maintenance tips will help

The implementation of safe work practices through electrical safety training is having a positive effect across industries and we hope this trend continues. When it’s all said and done, safety is at the core of any successful industrial business. Safer workers yield stronger companies!

To discuss how you can implement Electrical Safety Training into your companies training program, call (855) 712-7353 or contact NTT Training today!


[1] Occupational Injuries from Electrical Shock and Arc Flash Events by Dr. Richard B. Campbell and David A. Dini: http://www.nfpa.org/~/media/files/research/research-foundation/research-foundation-reports/electrical/rfarcflashoccdata.pdf
SKILLED WORKERS. STRONGER COMPANIES
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